Instructions on how to set a quickset longnet

Quickset Longnets, setting longnets & assembling longnets

When assembled to the following instructions a 100 yard longnet requires 13 poles, a 50 yard longnet requires 7 poles, a 25 yard longnet requires 4 poles, and a 6 yard stop or stealth net requires 2 poles.

Depending on the nature of the ground to be worked you may prefer to add poles to assist net handling characteristics. The numbers quoted above are what we consider the minimum required.

Every pole is supplied with two PVC grommets, each with a groove moulded around it, in which the lines are clove-hitched. The grommets are manufactured to be a tight fit on the pole and they enable the net to be moved up or down vertically on the poles to suit ground conditions. When the bottom grommet is properly ‘worn-in’ it will move easily on the pole and find the correct ground level as you push the pole into the ground, thus ensuring the foot line is tight to the ground. When taking the net up push the bottom grommet back down the pole slightly, ready for the next set. The grommet should not be loose enough to slip easily on the pole but should require slight pressure. Tightening the clove hitch will tighten the grommet fit.

NOTES BEFORE ASSEMBLING A LONGNET

  1. The Insulation tape referred to is not supplied with the kit and you will need to obtain a small roll before commencing assembly. It was omitted from the kit because it allows you to use your own colour preference.
  2. Our nets are supplied with heavy duty head and foot lines ready fitted and suitable for the grommets.

STAGE 1 - Fitting the two end poles

Every net has two end poles. In the case of a stop net only the two end poles are needed. Our poles are supplied in a black finish but we can also supply them in white for use as end poles on the longer length nets. They are then instantly recognizable as end poles, even in poor light conditions.

When your net arrives it may have an end line through the end meshes, tying the head and foot lines together. Remove this immediately prior to fitting an end pole. It is not required.

Take the two poles you intend to use as end poles and push on a grommet from the pointed end, sliding it up to just below the fitted end cap. Attach the first pole to the end of the net by, starting at the headline, pushing the pole point first through every end mesh. You will find this easier if the pole and net are in a horizontal plane. Then secure the head line to the top grommet with a clove hitch and a half hitch. Push a second grommet onto the pole, to a position about 3”/75mm above the point and tie the foot line to it in the same way as the head line. Tape the loose ends to the main line using the insulation tape.

Hold the pole horizontally and evenly spread the net meshes between the grommets. At about 6”/150mm above the bottom grommet tape an end mesh to the pole, and repeat this twice more at 10”/250mm centers. This will prevent the loose net sliding down and off the pole when it is in a vertical position. ( and then getting into a bloody great tangle! ). Remember when taping in the poles that the net will probably be used at a maximum height of about 30”/ 750mm so do not tape in higher than that.

Push this pole into the ground, measure out the length of your proposed net and lay the net on the ground over the proposed length. Fit the end pole at this end as you did at the other end but initially only tie the head line loosely into the grommet. It is very important to keep head and foot lines of the same length. The best way to achieve this is to permanently tie off the foot line and stretch it tight between the two poles, then push it into the ground. The head line is then adjusted to a tight match of the foot line.

Only the two end poles are fitted in this way, and if you are assembling a stop net it will now be ready for use.

Push this pole into the ground, measure out the length of your proposed net and lay the net on the ground over the proposed length. Fit the end pole at this end as you did at the other end but initially only tie the head line loosely into the grommet. It is very important to keep head and foot lines of the same length. The best way to achieve this is to permanently tie off the foot line and stretch it tight between the two poles, then push it into the ground. The head line is then adjusted to a tight match of the foot line.

Only the two end poles are fitted in this way, and if you are assembling a stop net it will now be ready for use.

STAGE 2 - Fitting intermediate poles

Slide two grommets onto each intermediate pole into the same positions as those on the two end poles.

To set up the 25 yard longnet push the two end poles, already fitted to the net as in STAGE 1, into the ground and even out the ‘slack’ along the head and foot lines. Now attach the other two poles at third points, approximately 8 yards, by fitting the head line and the foot line to the top and bottom grommet respectively with a clove hitch only. Make sure the net is on the same side of each pole. Do not push these poles through the mesh ( only the end poles are attached to the net ). A clove hitch is easily formed in the grommet without removing the line from the net, although you will need to remove the far end pole from the ground to gain enough slack to make the knot. Ensure head and foot lines are equally tensioned.

STAGE 3 - Setting the longnet net up

The net is now attached to the 4 poles. The next procedure is to tie the slack net into two yard pockets between all the poles using adhesive tape, or if you prefer by soft spun nylon or wool sewn through the line using a heavy needle. Start at one end and even out the slack net between the first two poles and then at the center point between the two poles tie one net mesh to the head line and, directly below it , tie one mesh to the foot line. Then at the center point of each of the halves repeat the procedure tying one mesh to the head line and one to the foot line. The net will then have four approximately two meters long pockets tied in between the first two poles. Repeat this between the other poles.

The great advantage of tying slack net into pockets is that it stops it all being blown to one end, or a rabbit pulling it all to one end. Some netsmen, and I am one of them, prefer to tie in the slack net on only the head line. Others prefer not to tie in the slack net at all. It is a decision you will have to take based on your own experience.

Your 25 yard longnet is now ready for use.

The 50 yard and 100 yard longnets are set up in exactly the same manner but using a greater number of poles.

Refer to the following diagram for knot instructions and placement:

Quickset longnets, assembling longnets and setting longnets